Troopers from Louisiana deal with winter storm conditions to help with recovery effort

Thursday, November 8, 2012 - 2:00pm

Over 1300 miles away you will find a small group of Louisiana State Police vehicles that are dealing with conditions unlike any they’ve encountered on regular duty.

“Temperature is in the 30's with a Nor'easter on the way,” a explained. “Not quite what we're used to in Louisiana.”

On Sunday, Nov. 4, a group of 25 troopers assigned to stations all over Louisiana were deployed to New Jersey to assist with Hurricane Sandy recovery effort. The deployment was a response to a request from the New Jersey State Police via the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) for out-of-state law enforcement support.

“The State of Louisiana certainly understands the importance of emergency support during a time of crisis,” Colonel Mike Edmonson, State Police Superintendent, said. “The New Jersey State Police was one of the first state police agencies which readily responded when the citizens of Louisiana needed assistance following the devastation of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.”

The Louisiana troopers have been assigned to an area considered to be one of the hardest hit.

"We were assigned to Stafford Township and Long Beach Island (Ocean County),” a trooper explained. “Our primary function is to patrol the areas for looting/scrapping, interact with the citizens and backup the local jurisdictions on calls for service. We also worked a checkpoint on a major thoroughfare, which runs to Long Beach Island.”

Restoration efforts are being complicated by the snow storm.

“We are expecting severe weather [today]. They are anticipating 3" - 5" of snow during the next day or two,” a trooper explained. “We should be at our assignments prior to the storm hitting, so we will be pre-positioned and ready to respond to any post-storm incidents."

Forecasters predicted gusts of up to 60 mph in shore towns and cities across New York and New Jersey, bringing 2- to 4-foot storm surges. However, there are signs the region is rebounding. The Louisiana troopers working in the area are glad their experience with catastrophic weather events can help move the recovery forward.

“Our troopers were approached throughout the detail by residents. We have been giving morale support to the residents and operational advice to the local jurisdictions.”

Officials have not provided a timeline as to how long the troopers will remain in the northeast.

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